Study of English

April 18, 2007

Transition in testimonies of former IANFU comfort woman Ms. Kim, Koon Ja

Filed under: IANFU 'comfort women',Korea — Sei-no-Syounagon @ 5:50 pm

Transition in testimonies of former IANFU comfort woman Ms. Kim, Koon Ja

Ms. Kim, Koon Ja is a former comfort woman.
She testified at the hearing of Subcommittee on Asia, the Pacific, and the Global Environment Committee on Foreign Affairs U.S. House of Representatives, on Thursday, February 15, 2007.

Her story changes every time she testifies.

#1.Form Handbook of the History Museum of Japanese Military Comfort Women attached to the “House of the Sharing” (The Facilities where it supports former comfort woman in korea )
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She became the adopted daughter of a policeman at the age of 16. The foster father said “There is a place where you can earn money, go there. If you can’t earn money, you can come back”, with Korean servicemen who came for taking to the house…”
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#2.Hokkaido Shimbun (news paper, Hokkaido, Japan ) on June 23, 2005 report.
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Ms. Kim who had lost parents at infancy became an adopted daughter in Kangwon-do, South Korea at the Japanese colony age 60 or more years ago. One day, the foster father said to her,”Please go run errands”, and she was taken to the train.
There are a lot of women there, and she saw soldier’s.
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#3.Testimony in “Gathering of peace, High school students of Tokyo” in November, 2005
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I lost my father at the age of ten, and lost mother at the age of 14, and became orphan.It was so in all those days, Life was hard. I went to others’ houses to work and was earning day money. I became policeman’s adopted daughter at the age of 16. I had the boyfriend in those days. However, I could not marry him. On March, 1942, the foster father said “You can earn money”, and I was taken by Korean servicemen.

#4.Asahi Shimbun on March 02, 2006 report.
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Her parents died at infancy, and she became an adopted daughter.Two Korean came to her house at the age of 17. “We let you work in a factory” The place where she was taken with the train is Hunchun of China in the vicinity of old Soviet border. It was a comfort place there.
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#5.Testimony at the hearing of Subcommittee on Asia, the Pacific, and the Global Environment Committee on Foreign Affairs U.S. House of Representatives, on Thursday, February 15, 2007.
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I became an orphan when I was 14 and I was placed in the home of Choi Chul Ji, a colonial police officer. As his “foster child,” I cooked and cleaned for Mr. Choi. I had a boyfriend and we wanted to be married. However, his family objected because I was an orphan.
I remember the day that changed my life forever. I was wearing a black skirt, a green shirt, and black shoes. It was March of 1942, and I was 16 years old. I had been sent out of the house by police officer Choi and told that I needed to go and make some money. I found a Korean man wearing a military uniform and he told me that he would send me on an errand and I would be paid for this errand. I followed him and he told me to board a train ? a freight car. I did not know where I was going but I saw seven other young girls and another man in a military uniform on this freight train. There were other soldiers in different cars on the train, but I didn’t see them until we came to a stop and I got off the train. A Japanese soldier with a ranking badge was waiting for us by a truck. The soldiers got on the truck and the other girls and I were put on the back of the truck.
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Her story changes every time she testifies.
Which part of her testimonies should we believe?

However, it is more consistent than Ms. Lee Yong-soo’s testimony. Perhaps, she might have been sold to the whoremonger by her foster father.
It is only one of the stories of the traffic in people of poor girls that existed in Korea and Japan proper in this age.

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